The Ancient Greek Dependency Treebank, added to the bibliography

Cover of Digital Classics Outside the Echo-ChamberIn 2016 Francesco Mambrini published a chapter in the book, Digital Classics Outside the Echo-Chamber, edited by M. Romanello and G. Bodard and published by Ubiquity Press in London.  Mambrini’s chapter is entitled, “The Ancient Greek Dependency Treebank: Linguistic Annotation in a Teaching Environment.” Today I added that chapter to the bibliography at Greek-Language.com and GreekLinguistics.com.

You can read Mambrini’s chapter online for free, or purchase a copy of the book, at https://doi.org/10.5334/bat.f.

Finite vs. non-finite complementation in Post-classical and Early Byzantine Greek

Journal of Greek Linguistics

About a year or so ago, I added Klaas Bentein’s paper from the first issue of 2017 of the Journal of Greek Linguistics to the bibliography at Greek-Language.com (and GreekLinguistics.com). The article treats forms of complementation for verbs in the post-classical and early Byzantine periods. I decided today to write a little more about that article to give you a clearer idea of what it does.

Between the Classical and Hellenistic periods and beyond, there was significant change in the types of complementation used most commonly. In this article, Bentein responds to Cristofaro’s 1996 claim in Discourse Cohesion in Ancient Greek that the Classical opposition between the accusative and infinitive being used for non-factive complements, while ὅτι with either the indicative and the accusative or the participle were used for factive ones, was disappearing in the post-classical era, with ὅτι coming to be used as a ‘generic’ complementiser.

Looking at documentary texts, including papyri, from the first to the eighth centuries CE, Bentein examines several categories of verbs (causative verbs, verbs used to give orders, verbs of perception, verbs of mental state, psychological verbs, and verbs of communication), identifying the complement structures used with each verb type.  He also examines the social contexts represented when each type of complementation is used and sees a shift, or realignment of complement patterns with changes moving in different directions for high status and low status speakers.

If you are interested in the social status of various forms of speech or in the historical development and change in forms of complementation, you should enjoy Bentein’s article.

PDFIf you decide you’d like to read the entire paper, click the read button to go to where it’s posted on Brill’s site.

Sabine Tuillier on the Diccionario Griego – Español

The Diccionario Griego-Español project
I have added Sabine Tuillier’s discussion of the Diccionario Griego-Español project to the bibliography at Greek-Language.com and GreekLinguistics.com.

Tuillier’s paper could be viewed as outside the scope of the bibliography, so I’ll take a moment to explain why I have added it. While the paper itself does not discuss a particular linguistic theory, the work it is discussing provides a huge advance in the ability to apply any linguistic theory to the study of ancient Greek. The Diccionario Griego-Español represents a wonderful advance in the field ancient Greek lexicography.

The paper was published in the first edition of Janus, a Spanish language journal focussed on the Golden Age of Spain, but touching tangential matters where helpful to that focus. You can view or download a copy of the article at either of the following locations:

You can read the abstract in both English and Spanish here.

Ancient Greek Linguistics: New Approaches, Insights, Perspectives

Felicia Logozzo and Paolo Poccetti have edited an impressive compilation of linguistic research on Ancient Greek. All but one of the chapters address either Classical or Homeric Greek, but one, a brief note on  synthetic forms of the future in Hellenistic Greek, addresses the time period of our focus here.

  • Liana Tronci, “Forme sintetiche del futuro nel greco ellenistico, Brevi note sulla Settanta”

Have any of you seen this book? Tronci’s article is written in Italian, but many of the other articles are in English. Do we have any Italian speakers who would be willing to read Tronci’s article and comment on it?

Changes in complement structure from Classical to Byzantine Greek

Journal of Greek Linguistics

In the first issue of the Journal of Greek Linguistics this year (2017), Klaas Bentein examined changes in the way verbal complements were formed between the Classical and Byzantine periods. Here’s what the abstract of his paper says:

While Classical Greek has a particularly rich complementation system, in later times there is a tendency towards the use of finite complementation. In this context, Cristofaro (1996) has claimed that the Classical opposition whereby the accusative and infinitive is used for non-factive complements, and ὅτι with the indicative and the accusative and participle for factive ones, is disappearing, ὅτι being used as a ‘generic’ complementiser. In this article, I investigate to what extent Cristofaro’s (1996) claim of the pragmatic neutralisation of complementation patterns can be upheld, and whether it could be claimed that a new pragmatic opposition, in terms of ‘register’, is being established. For this purpose, I turn towards documentary papyri, a corpus which is particularly fruitful for socio-historical investigations.

You can read this paper here. I have added it to the Comprehensive Bibliography of Hellenistic Greek Linguistics.

A Computational study on preverbal and postverbal accusative object nouns and pronouns in Ancient Greek

I have added Giuseppe Celano’s 2014 paper, “A Computational study on preverbal and postverbal accusative object nouns and pronouns in Ancient Greek,” (The Prague Bulletin of Mathematical Linguistics, no. 101, April 2014, pp. 97–110) to the Comprehensive Bibliography of Hellenistic Greek Linguistics.

Drawing on data from Homer to the New Testament, Celano argues for a gradual shift from OV to VO constituent order. You can view or download a pdf copy here.

Monosemy and Polysemy in Biblical Studies: A Minimalist Basis for Empirical Analysis of the Biblical Languages

Ryder Wishart has completed a masters thesis that fits very well into the category of works applying concepts from the field of Linguistics to the study of Ancient Greek. His theses has a broader focus on the biblical languages more generally, but the application to Greek is of direct relevance for the community here at Greek-Language.com.

I have added Wishart’s thesis to the bibliography where you will find a link to download a copy from Academia.edu if you would like.

Congratulations to Ryder for completing this work!

A Linguistic Analysis of the Articular Infinitive in New Testament Greek

Burk, Articular InfinitiveI have added Dennis Ray Burk’s doctoral dissertation “A linguistic analysis of the articular infinitive in New Testament Greek” to the bibliography.

Dr. Burk wrote this dissertation in 2004, and the data he compiled has contributed positively to the ongoing development of open data resources.

If you have other works that you would like to see included in A Comprehensive Bibliography of Hellenistic Greek Linguistics, you can check the criteria for inclusion and make a suggestion by clicking the bibliography link at the top of any page on this blog.

New Testament Verbs of Communication

danoventverbsofcommunicationI have added Paul Danove’s New Testament Verbs of Communication: A Case Frame and Exegetical Study to the bibliography.

Danove has been developing his Case Frame analysis since the mid 1990s, and along the way he has contributed significantly to our understanding of the argument structure of Hellenistic Greek verbs. It is good to see this new addition.