No more Academia.edu

Today I deleted the content I had uploaded to Academia.edu and closed my account. I took this action after contacting Academia.edu multiple times about the deceptive emails they send to get people to sign up for their premium service.

I’m looking for a more ethical alternative service. If you have one you like to use to share your scholarly work, please feel free to mention it in a comment here.


Update added Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Two articles about for-profit companies using scholarly work produced by others to make money:

Two not-for-profit companies providing ways to share scholarly research without getting flooded with SPAM:

I am still reading about these organizations and other efforts to provide true Open Access for my own work. If you know of others, please share them.

The Ancient Greek Dependency Treebank, added to the bibliography

Cover of Digital Classics Outside the Echo-ChamberIn 2016 Francesco Mambrini published a chapter in the book, Digital Classics Outside the Echo-Chamber, edited by M. Romanello and G. Bodard and published by Ubiquity Press in London.  Mambrini’s chapter is entitled, “The Ancient Greek Dependency Treebank: Linguistic Annotation in a Teaching Environment.” Today I added that chapter to the bibliography at Greek-Language.com and GreekLinguistics.com.

You can read Mambrini’s chapter online for free, or purchase a copy of the book, at https://doi.org/10.5334/bat.f.

Finite vs. non-finite complementation in Post-classical and Early Byzantine Greek

Journal of Greek Linguistics

About a year or so ago, I added Klaas Bentein’s paper from the first issue of 2017 of the Journal of Greek Linguistics to the bibliography at Greek-Language.com (and GreekLinguistics.com). The article treats forms of complementation for verbs in the post-classical and early Byzantine periods. I decided today to write a little more about that article to give you a clearer idea of what it does.

Between the Classical and Hellenistic periods and beyond, there was significant change in the types of complementation used most commonly. In this article, Bentein responds to Cristofaro’s 1996 claim in Discourse Cohesion in Ancient Greek that the Classical opposition between the accusative and infinitive being used for non-factive complements, while ὅτι with either the indicative and the accusative or the participle were used for factive ones, was disappearing in the post-classical era, with ὅτι coming to be used as a ‘generic’ complementiser.

Looking at documentary texts, including papyri, from the first to the eighth centuries CE, Bentein examines several categories of verbs (causative verbs, verbs used to give orders, verbs of perception, verbs of mental state, psychological verbs, and verbs of communication), identifying the complement structures used with each verb type.  He also examines the social contexts represented when each type of complementation is used and sees a shift, or realignment of complement patterns with changes moving in different directions for high status and low status speakers.

If you are interested in the social status of various forms of speech or in the historical development and change in forms of complementation, you should enjoy Bentein’s article.

PDFIf you decide you’d like to read the entire paper, click the read button to go to where it’s posted on Brill’s site.

Sabine Tuillier on the Diccionario Griego – Español

The Diccionario Griego-Español project
I have added Sabine Tuillier’s discussion of the Diccionario Griego-Español project to the bibliography at Greek-Language.com and GreekLinguistics.com.

Tuillier’s paper could be viewed as outside the scope of the bibliography, so I’ll take a moment to explain why I have added it. While the paper itself does not discuss a particular linguistic theory, the work it is discussing provides a huge advance in the ability to apply any linguistic theory to the study of ancient Greek. The Diccionario Griego-Español represents a wonderful advance in the field ancient Greek lexicography.

The paper was published in the first edition of Janus, a Spanish language journal focussed on the Golden Age of Spain, but touching tangential matters where helpful to that focus. You can view or download a copy of the article at either of the following locations:

You can read the abstract in both English and Spanish here.

Forthcoming Intermediate Lexicon from Cambridge

The Gospels and Acts from the New Testament form a small part of what will be covered by the forthcoming intermediate lexicon from Cambridge, projected to become available for purchase next year. The following video (just under 10 minutes in length) gives an overview of the work that has been taking place over the past fifteen years.

The new lexicon will be different from existing ones, its authors assure us, in several ways, two of which are the rejection of what is often called “glosses” (one-word translations) and an elevation of sense over syntax.

There is a strong focus on identification of sense distinctions and a detailed description of them, as opposed to an older methodology in ancient Greek dictionaries where general catch-all single word translations were used, along with a bias in the presentation towards the highlighting of syntactic information, which in practice tends to override somewhat unsubtly the divisions of sense.

The quote above comes from the first page of the introduction to the lexicon on the University of Cambridge website. That introduction includes useful information about the team working on the project and the methodology they are using. It also discusses the funding, the use of XML to mark up the text, and much more. The following are links to the various parts of the introduction.

Cambridge Greek Lexicon (The home of the video embedded above)

 

Future Middle and Passive

Sky Scape of Lima, Peru
Sky Scape of Lima, Perú by George Miquilena (adapted by Micheal Palmer)

I’m enjoying the 67° weather (19.4° C) in Miraflores, investigating the future middle and passive in Ancient Greek. My goal is to read every occurrence of the future non-active forms in the Greek New Testament before returning to the US in a few days. It’s time I wrote lesson 24 for the online grammar!

Epigraphy Page: Sara B. Aleshire Center for the Study of Greek Epigraphy

Ancient Greek Epigraphy: the Ephesus InscriptionI have updated the Epigraphy Page at Greek-Language.com and GreekLinguistics.com, adding a link to The Sara B. Aleshire Center for the Study of Greek Epigraphy at the University of California, Birkeley and updating information on several other organizations.

Thank you to astute reader, Cristóbal for pointing out a typographical error in this post!

While the Sara B. Aleshire Center is focused primarily on encouraging and supporting the research of UC Berkeley faculty and graduate students, it provides resources that are of significant value for anyone studying ancient Greek inscriptions, including images of the inscriptions in their possession.

 

SBL 2018 – Popup Greek?

Once again this November, Jonathan Robie and I will present an update on the work we are doing to create free materials for teaching Hellenistic Greek as a living language.

Photo by Steven Gerner, Blue Bear at the Convention Center

I look forward to seeing many of you at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver.  There will be plenty to do and a lot of great papers. Our presentation will take place at 1:00 pm. We have the first slot in the session, Innovative Approaches to Teaching Biblical Languages, joint session by Global Education & Research Technology and Academic Teaching & Biblical Studies.

Here is an abstract like the one that will appear in the program book:

Teachers increasingly recognize the importance of teaching biblical Greek using the same kind of effective techniques used to teach modern languages in schools and universities. These techniques focus on carefully designed learning activities that require the student to think in the target language in order to respond appropriately.

There are now several university level courses that take this approach to teaching Greek, but we believe that there is a real need for a course that (1) can be taught by anyone with a solid reading knowledge of Greek (using the teacher’s notes and recordings we provide), (2) concentrates on texts drawn from the New Testament, and (3) is freely available. For those who do not have access to a teacher, we believe that it is also important to be able to learn online.

The course we are developing works through New Testament texts using pictures, TPR, and asking and answering questions in Greek. Each lesson has (1) a content objective focused an authentic Greek text and (2) a language objective expressing the skill to be mastered.

Linguistic terms are taught after students have experienced the construct they describe. Before introducing a term like “1st person singular,” we expose students to the word ἐγώ and verb forms that correspond to it. Before introducing terms like “nominative, genitive, dative, accusative,” we teach how to ask and answer questions using the forms τίς, τίνος, τίνι, τίνα. Before introducing terms like “circumstantial participle,” we act out scenarios that illustrate the relationship between two verbs.

In keeping with the philosophy of this course, our presentation will focus on presenting sample teaching activities live rather than talking about them, followed by discussion of the specific content or language objective and why we teach it the way we do.

Join us for a lively discussion.

In the same session several other topics will be discussed, all related to teaching biblical languages.

While I’m writing about SBL, I might as well make one more plug for Mike Aubrey’s presentation that will take place at 9:00 am on the same day as these: Compounding and Cognitive Processes in Word Formation with ὑδροποτέω and its relatives: Was anyone ever a “water drinker”?  I had a bit to say about this earlier, and Mike has written about it Koine-Greek.com as well.