HellenisticGreek.com

Lesson 23 imageThe domain name HellenisticGreek.com has until yesterday pointed to the online grammar that has for several years been housed at Greek-Language.com/grammar (and, more recently, at GreekLinguistics.com/grammar). Now, however, I have moved the content of those directories so that all of the grammar materials are housed directly at HellenisticGreek.com. That way, the grammar materials only need to be updated in a single location.

Greek-Language.com/grammar and GreekLinguistics.com/grammar now both redirect to HellenisticGreek.com rather than the other way around. Unfortunately, that means that if you have bookmarked any of the lessons, you will need to update your bookmarks. I apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

For a few days, HellenisticGreek.com may show up in your browser as insecure. But that problem will resolve itself in a few days when the domain name registration is finished migrating to a new provider. Since there are no transactions to be completed on the site anyway, it will not be a problem.

LaParola.net

I would like to offer my sincere thanks to Richard Wilson, designer of LaParola.net, for the work he has put into producing an online reader for the Greek New Testament complete with variant readings.

What is particularly outstanding about the site is that it is based on the work of many people committed to open resources. For morphological tagging, for example, he uses James Tauber’s MorphGNT. The Greek text is the SBLGNT (not completely open source, but open enough to allow what LaParola is doing with it). And Wilson has also provided access to Westcott and Hort (1881) and Tischendorf (8th edition; 1869-1872) drawing on open source materials, and he has even made it possible to embed these materials in other websites.

This is a real gift to the wider community.

Use of Flashcards in teaching Communicative Ancient Greek

Book Cover: Teaching with Tech 2016

In Teaching with Tech 2016: Language Educators Talking Tech, Paul Nitz has recently published an article arguing for using digital flashcards in teaching Ancient Greek even when using a communicative approach. This is something of an unusual proposal, but Dr. Nitz accompanies  it with compelling arguments. In particular, he recognizes the differences between modern language teaching where immersion in the language is possible and extremely useful, and ancient language classes where the same level of immersion in the language is simply not a reasonable possibility.

You can read Paul’s article online at SmashWords.com. I’d love to hear what you think.

ὁ κῆπός μου νιφοστιβής ἐστιν

ὁ κῆπός μου νιφοστιβής

Thanks to Sententia Antiquae for the snow-related vocabulary. What an appropriate post for our current situation! We don’t have a lot of snow here in Chapel Hill, but it’s enough to make minor roads dangerous, causing local schools to be closed for the day.

Color Scheme Change

While the content of Greek-Language.com and GreekLinguistics.com remains identical, the color scheme is now different.

Greek-Language.com

Header Menu Footer

GreekLinguistics.com

Header Menu Footer

Feel free to let me know which one you prefer. You can use the Contact page for this purpose.

Software Page

I have updated the software page at Greek-Language.com and GreekLinguistics.com, removing links that no longer work and eliminating links to insecure servers.

While I’ve tried to include discussions of all of the software packages that allow reading and analysis of Ancient Greek texts, it is almost certain that I have missed some. If you have a favorite program that I have missed, please use the Contact page to let me know. I will be glad to add any program that you find useful for reading Ancient Greek or analyzing Ancient Greek texts.

Ancient Greek Linguistics: New Approaches, Insights, Perspectives

Felicia Logozzo and Paolo Poccetti have edited an impressive compilation of linguistic research on Ancient Greek. All but one of the chapters address either Classical or Homeric Greek, but one, a brief note on  synthetic forms of the future in Hellenistic Greek, addresses the time period of our focus here.

  • Liana Tronci, “Forme sintetiche del futuro nel greco ellenistico, Brevi note sulla Settanta”

Have any of you seen this book? Tronci’s article is written in Italian, but many of the other articles are in English. Do we have any Italian speakers who would be willing to read Tronci’s article and comment on it?

HTTPS and free online Greek resources: The Dictionaries Page

I have updated the Dictionaries page to make clear which resources linked there are running on secure servers and which are not. Since the implementation of HTTPS everywhere, Chrome and some other browsers are flagging sites as insecure when they are not running under that standard. Any page that links to them is also classified as insecure. This impacts what I am doing at Greek-Language.com and GreekLinguistics.com. To solve this problem, I have temporarily disabled links to sites running on insecure servers, but kept the link text so that you can paste it into your browser’s location bar if you are willing to take the very minor risk it presents.

Links to insecure pages are shown in dark red and do not do anything when you click on them.

http://ExampleInsecureDomain.com/

If want to visit the linked page, you will need to copy the link and paste it into the location bar at the top of your browser window.

Paul Nitz’ review of M. Diaz Avila’s Alexandros.

In volume 8, issue 1 of Teaching Classical Languages, Paul Nitz has written a very helpful review of M. Díaz Avila’s Alexandros, Nitz considers the possible suitability of Avila’s book for a text-based introduction to Ancient Greek using a Communicative Model. The review is well worth reading.

Because Avila’s book, based on the earlier work of W.H.D. Rouse (1909), is a clear example of Applied Linguistics (use of a linguistically informed, research-based model to support language acquisition), I am adding the review to the Comprehensive Bibliography of Hellenistic Greek Linguistics.

Thank you, Paul!

Καλά Χριστούγεννα 2017

I wish you all a wonderful Christmas.

Here is how the Greek Phrase for “Merry Christmas” would have sounded between the time of Jesus’ birth and about 250 CE. It is doubtful that anyone actually uttered this greeting in the first century after Jesus was born, but if they had, here’s how it would have sounded!

I’ve provided the recording in three popular formats so that you can hear it even if you are using an outdated browser. At least one of the formats should work for you.

Three versions of the recording
m4a

AAC

mp3

 

Why is it likely no one used this saying before 100CE? Well, we just have no evidence that Christmas was celebrated at all before that date. The invention of the holiday came a bit later. Still, feel free to use the greeting now that we do celebrate Christmas!

A note on spelling
There is one small difference in spelling of the Christmas greeting between 300 CE and the present: the system of written accents has been simplified. Contrast the following spellings. Can you see the difference?
Modern: Καλά Χριστούγεννα
Hellenistic: Καλὰ Χριστούγεννα